Asexuality and Christianity, a prologue

The first adjustment in my mental card catalogue on sexuality: demisexual is a shade of ace. It seems it’s treated that way in the wider discourse, and I think it’s good to adopt it. Since I’m starting a series on issues related to sexuality that’s not just applicable to my particular flavour, I’ve chosen to speak about “asexuality” rather than “demisexuality” for this series.

My religious and sexual identities conflict. Not because I risk discrimination, since a lesser or absent sex drive is not very likely to offend any parties other than whoever’s trying to have sex with you. But as discourses, the asexuality blog-o-sphere and Christian church express some very different beliefs, especially on the subject of sex. I feel I cannot participate in either openly and sincerely without reconciling what I believe to be true about my faith with what I believe to be true about my sexuality.

This won’t mean I can resolve centuries-old issues about sex and morality. It does mean I feel the two discourses can mesh, and I blog about one individual case in which they do, hopefully.

I will be entering into this discussion with a personal stake, but I believe that might be the only way to talk about a sensitive subject. I think few of us are unaffected by religion, member or not. To be fair, I do write as someone who was raised Christian and in a very liberal country and is comfortable with both these facts.

I wish to explore some of the core areas of contention by taking a closer look at what a few schools of thought or influential people have to say about sex, love and sexuality. I invite suggestions for topics in this series, and I’m always looking for other points of view, so if you’ve read or written about this subject, let me know. And feel free to leave your own questions or ideas for topics in a comment.

The posts planned in this series at this point:

  • Asexuality and the Sanctification of Sexual Purity
  • Asexuality and American Christians on Lust
  • Asexuality and Apostle Paul about the Sense of Sex
  • Asexuality and (Saint) Augustine on Chastity
  • Asexuality and Space for Abstinence
  • Asexuality and Denominational Variations
  • Asexuality around the Christian World
Advertisements

Posted on June 15, 2015, in What others say and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 10 Comments.

  1. Well for Roman Catholics, there is the tradition of holy celibacy for priests, monks and nuns. High Church Anglicans also have nuns. Yes, I know asexuality and celibacy aren’t the same thing, but it can be helpful for self esteem and social approval to see highly esteemed celibate role models in your culture, and I speak as someone brought up by Catholic parents.

    Like

    • Thanks! It’s absolutely true, and the difference between those two is one of the key issues that’ll feature in the series. Perhaps it is a good idea to take a closer look at how it affected social status in particular.

      Like

  2. Don’t know if you’ve already seen them yet, but I’ve written a lot of posts on this subject, two of which you might be interested in are here and here.

    Like

  3. Well I was always dismissed as a paragon of virtue, even though I despised the RC church from age 14 and said so – in my teens it t was always assumed by my peers that I wanted to be a nun or a saint. And whenever I said I didn’t want a boyfriend to an adult,the response was always, “Oh do you want to be a nun?”. The culture isn’t that big on marriage – most of the saints were our role models were nuns, monks, those martyred early or r ill people suffering in bed.

    Like

    • good point, getting praise for the not-having of sex is about as welcome as being censured for having it, and about as logical (not at all).

      And the big presence of chaste role models..
      far bigger than I ever thought of, even taking into account how Mary has become synonymous for virgin and being a mom, two kinda mutually exclusive things, biology being what it is.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. That the nuns were superior to the wives and mothers, the Mars to their Marthas, was the way it seemed. Because in that religion it was kind of as if sex was always wrong, with so much made of the holy virgin.

    Like

  5. Sorry autocorrect mistake – meant to say Marys to Marthas.

    Like

  1. Pingback: Linkspam: June 19th, 2015 | The Asexual Agenda

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

The Reconstructionist

a meta-contrarian look at gender and sj

A Hat Full of Ness

Because I Have Words: Surviving Postgraduate Study in the UK

Myscape

I'm just here to write my very best

Prismatic Entanglements

dew-covered spider web of metaphorical condensed thoughts

Genderweird

An autistic, asexual, gender neutral person exploring life beyond the gender binary.

Reflective Ace

Reflections on identity and other stuff

Asexuality in A Sexual World

A blog about being asexual in a sex - saturated world

Beauty In Bundles

Reviews, beauty, random musings, oh my!

%d bloggers like this: